The End of Tipping.

The traveling men are trying to abolish the tipping evil in the hotels. It would seem that to stop the tipping by stopping the tips is a perfectly good way.

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Minnetonka Record, January 26, 1912

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The Truth in New York.

New York is worried over the case of a woman who goes around proposing marriage to every man she meets. If she merely had some scheme whereby she could take his money from every man she met New York would not consider her case remarkable.

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Minnetonka Record, January 26, 1912

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Matching Fashions.

Women's umbrellas must match their costumes is the fashion edict from London. But what use is a hobbled umbrella?

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Minnetonka Record, January 26, 1912

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Valuations In Law.

A horse thief in Pennsylvania was sentenced to 20 years in prison, and a white slaver in New York to two years and a fine. The comparative valuations of the law in the cases cited carry their own comment.

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Minnetonka Record, January 5, 1912

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How Term "Mug" Originated.
In the Days of Old Faces of Men Were Fitted Upon the Ale Jugs.

When you call for a draught of ale in a chop house it is served quite as often as not in a toby, a jug modeled roughly after the form of a little old man in a cocked hat. This chop house toby of today was quite probably "made in Germany," but his ancestors came from England.

Most of them belong to Staffordshire and there is not a solemn one among the lot. In the latter part of the eighteenth century and the early years of the nineteenth famous men's faces were fitted to pitchers much as nowadays the likenesses of our national characters are cast in plaster of paris and sold in the shops.

So it is that we find Wellington and Drake, General Power and Lord Nelson, hollowed into ale mugs for the greater glory of their deeds. It has even been asserted that here originated the unhandsome term "mug" as the colloquial designation of the face.

From the collector's viewpoint there are two classes of toby, the portrait toby and the jug, which is merely a comic. The portraits may be of historic worthies or they may simulate ideal characters such as John Bull or mythical characters such as Punch or characters from fiction such as Falstaff. --Country Life in America.

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Minnetonka Record, January 12, 1912

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